Archive for the ‘Latin America’ Category

3P-063 Connecting the DOTS: Deepening Our Thinking on Sovereignty

This episode recaps a week of Connecting the DOTS – our new UniverseCity blog that responds to Democracy Now. It features Percy Schmeiser’s “Principles of Food and Agriculture,” and a rebuttal to Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel that quotes James Loewen’s Lies My Teacher Told Me. We suggest that, along with germs, natives hadn’t built up an immunity to religions without honor.

The next section, entitled “Shadow Wars and Guerilla Presidents,” looks at Arundhati Roy in India, the new President of Brazil, Dilma Rousseff, and the printer bomb that warrants drone attacks and hunter-killer teams in Yemen. Spencer Ackerman’s Wired article on “The Shadow War in Yemen” is quoted. The concluding piece, called “What’s Your Breaking Point?” poses Ralph Nader’s question of what would cause Democrats to walk away from the party. His reference to a moral compass is explored in light of foreign policy, and we call for a resurgence of the nonbinding referendum.

Poems:

  • “Soul Food” – #2 of the Tao te Ching by Ursula K. Le Guin from The Way and the Power of the Way
  • “By Contrast” – #2 of the Tao te Ching by Tereza Coraggio
  • “II,16″ by Ranier Maria Rilke from The Book of Hours translated by Anita Barrows and Joanna Macy

Songs:

  • “Isolate” by Moby from the Wait for Me CD
  • “Mothers of the Disappeared” by U2 from Joshua Tree
  • “Instant Karma” by U2 from Amnesty International’s tribute album of the same name

To view the multimedia transcript or listen to the show, click here.

3P-058 Honduras: The People Speak

This episode chronicles the violent aftermath of the Honduran coup, which Hilary Clinton has lauded as a return to normalcy. However, the Honduran people are not defeated. A Constituent People’s Assembly is being convened to strategize a map to the next world. Bertha Caceres Flores’ poetic invitation to the Assembly asks them to bring solidarity in their sack of dreams, but her agenda is clear-eyed and pragmatic. We answer their invitation with a parallel agenda for the US and use their blueprint for a new Constitution to re-envision our own consumer democracy.

Bertha is a leader of COPINH: The Council of Popular & Indigenous Organizations of Honduras. Intertwined throughout this tribute to the indigenous struggle of the Hondurans are the poetry, songs, videos, and quotes of Joy Harjo, visionary Cherokee poet and saxophone player. Alongside these two practical mystics, native to their lands, we also claim our legacy as proud descendents of peasants and commoners, witches and troublemakers.

Poem:

  • “A Map to the Next World” by Joy Harjo

Songs and/or Music Videos:

  • “Song for Survival” by Mike Oldfield and the Anuta Tribe
  • “A Post-Colonial Tale” by Joy Harjo
  • “This is My Heart” by Joy Harjo

Click here to view the transcript or listen to the audio file. Thanks to Grahame Russell and Annie Bird of Rights Action, and Tom Louden of the Quixote Center for the information in this episode. Food in the ‘Hood has now raised $1900 for indigenous organizations of Honduras and Peru. Bruce Parry’s CD “Amazon Tribe: Songs for Survival” is also featured as a fundraiser for Survival International.

3P-056 Faith & Quakes, or Don’t Blame God for Haiti

Faith & Quakes: Examines the question of theodicy that has puzzled philosophers from Plato to Barbara Ehrenreich: if God is all-good and all-powerful, how can evil exist? Gives a brief history, including St. Iranaeus, St. Augustine, and Alfred Whitehead, and proposes a new answer to “Are people born wicked, or do they have wickedness thrust upon them?”

Demonstrates why the catastrophe in Haiti is an effect of empire, not God. Compares the US military invasion, ala Katrina, to the responses of Iceland, France, Italy, Nicaragua, Cuba, Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Senegal,
and Palestine. Presents Haiti’s history in opposing colonialism and the ways they’ve paid for this “deal with the devil” – crushing embargoes, onerous debts, brutal dictatorships, and free-market famines. Suggests that Papa Bush and Baby Bush have more to do with Haiti’s tragedy than God.

Poem:

  • “Celestial Music” by Louise Gluck

Songs and/or Music Videos:

  • “Because It’s There” by Michael Hedges
  • “Freewill” by Rush
  • “The Saints Are Coming” by U2 and Green Day

Informational Videos

  • “The Problem of Evil: A Challenge to God’s Existence?” by A2

To veiw the multimedia transcript and audio player, click here. Note to subscribers: we apologize for a couple of extra posts recently. We added the blog to a number of directories, which required verification codes. Also, my computer’s been taken over by a poltergeist, so email may be sporadic while it’s being exorcised. Thanks!

3P-044 Resistance & Waves of Loving Kindness

Resistance & Waves of Loving Kindness: Compares the Congressional response to scandals at two organizations with public funding – ACORN and the war contractor, KBR. On Honduras, contrasts the solidarity of the resistance movement in Latin America to the divisiveness of nonviolent activists in the US. Reads Amy Goodman’s blogpost on Zelaya’s return, “The Audacity of Action.” Looks at the Venezuelan blog, “Postcards from the Revolution,” by attorney and author Eva Golinger. Reviews the US Council of Foreign Policy’s conditions for Zelaya’s return. Questions the neutrality of IndyBay and answers a critic about Noah’s relevance to Palestine.

Poems:

  • Burton D. Carley, “September Meditation”
  • James Broughton, “Having Come This Far”

Songs and/or Music Videos: 

  • Moby, “Everloving”
  • Muse, “Uprising”

Informational Videos:

  • “Star Wars: An Environmentalists Version,” by Derrick Jensen and Franklin Lopez. 

3P-041 Undermining Empire with Vivek Chibber

Undermining Empire: Quotes from Chibber’s review “The Good Empire” on Niall Ferguson’s book Colossus, which suggests that America should take lessons in empire-building from the British. Examines puppet governments that start thinking they’re a real boy: Saddam Hussein, Israel, and the military coup in Honduras.  Reads a message from Tom Louden, who led an international delegation to Honduras, about the possibility that the children of activists are being tortured.  Examines Marxism’s centralization of power and its lack of resiliency to totalitarian coups.

Poems:  

Songs and/or Music Videos

Audio Bonus:

3P-038 Don’t Make Me Hit You: The Rationalization of Violence

Don’t Make Me Hit You: Discusses the blaming of Zelaya, the Honduran President, for the violent acts of the coup regime. Looks at US and Canadian corporate interests in Honduras, such as Fruit of the Loom, Russell, Hanes, Gap, Gildan, Adidas, Nike, Dole, and Chaquita, and their response to Zelaya’s 60% raise of the minimum wage. Role-reverses Hilary Clinton and Mel Zelaya. Analyzes the question of whether morality is relative in terms of torture, terrorism, or killing, contrasting the zealots and the Q’uran to the Ten Commandments. Looks at military recruiting and the falsehoods and artificial choices presented to HS seniors.

Poem:

  • Demetrice Anntia Worley, “Feminicide/ Fimicidio” on the disappearances of women and girls in Cuidad, Juarez. Won the Split This Rock contest sponsored by Foreign Policy in Focus. 

Songs and/or Music Videos:

  • Sting and Peter Gabriel, Spanish version of “They Dance Alone” on the disappearances of men and boys by Pinochet. Performed in Argentina in 1998.
  • David Ippolito, “Torture is Wrong or We Can Do Better Than This,” great video
  • Sting, English version of “They Dance Alone”

3P-036 People Are Animals Too

People are Animals Too: Questions the religion of vegetarianism. Differentiates between the evils of industrial meat production, illustrated by the movie Food, Inc., and the joys of animal husbandry, as detailed in the book, Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer. Reports on interview with Novella Carpenter and with Elise Pearlstein, co- producer of Food, Inc. Discusses two films from the Ironweed film club called Asparagus: Stalking the Good Life, and A Growing Season. Updates the resistance news from the Honduran coup. Critiques an article by Daniel Brook in Tikkun magazine called “The Planet-Saving Mitzvah: Why Jews Should Consider Vegetarianism.”

Poems

  • Wendall Barry, “Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front”

Songs and/or Music Videos:

  • Paul Taylor, “Set Me Free” 
  • Dana Lyons, “Cows With Guns” and “Berries Overgrown”

Informational Video:

  • Robert Kenner, “Food, Inc.”

3P-034 Confusion in the Cosmovision

Confusion in the Cosmovision: Replays an excerpt of an interview with Tupac Enrique Acosta called Wars of the Petropolis. Shows why the indigenous alliance of the Abya Yala looks at the culture of disposable resources as a confusion in the cosmovision. Reports on the latest news of the return of President Zelaya to Honduras, and the Cobra swarm snipers, thousands of heavily-armed soldiers, and 200,000 citizens that await him at the airport. Celebrates a local event called Food in the Hood benefiting the Amazonians through Red Ambiental Loretana, and Hondurans through Rights Action. Presents background research on Honduras regarding the School of the Americas, US military aid, sweatshop workers, and disappeared journalists. Relates the military coup in Honduras to the micro-coup at FRSC.

Poems:

  • Judy Brown, “Fire”
  • e.e.cummings, “seeker of truth”

Songs and/or Music Videos:

  • God is an Astronaut, “Remaining Light” 
  • Ethan Miller, “The Invisible Hand of the Market”
  • Devil Makes Three, “The Poison Trees”
  • Chumbawumba, “To a Little Radio”

3P-033 The Comedy of the Commons

The Comedy of the Commons: Takes a critical look at the Tragedy of the Commons. Elaborates the true tragedy of the monopoly, which has been taken to new heights by the global land grab in response to food insecurity. Examines how the usurping of land for oil, gas, logging, and mining has led to the massacre in the Amazon, due to the US-Peru Free2Raid Agreement. Introduces Presidents Correa and Morales UN sideshow on dismantling the International Center for Settlement of Investor Disputes.  Elucidates the US position that favors democracy but backs paramilitary groups and secession to control resources. Reports on breaking news with the military coup in Honduras and the popular support that has not been deterred. Talks about the 225 cardboard pigs delivered by Avaaz to the WHO, representing 225,000 petitioners demanding an investigation of the swine flu link to factory farms. With the possibility of State Park closures in CA, develops a plan to turn Wilder Ranch into a working eco-ranch with heritage chickens, heirloom pigs, and a dual-purpose dairy.

Poems:

  • Mark Jarman, “Coyotes”

Songs and/or Music Videos:

  • Bruce Cockburn, “If a Tree Falls in the Forest”
  • David Rovics, “The Commons”
  • India Arie, “A Beautiful Day”

Informational Video:

  • “The Power of Community: How Cuba Survived Peak Oil”

3P-030 Plant Radishes for Hope: Palestine

Plant Radishes for Hope: Compares the early sprouting of radish seeds to the evidential hope in Frances Moore Lappe’s talk, The Work of Hope. Applies this to Obama’s Cairo talk and its implications for Palestine. Includes an interview with Phyllis Bennis, Institute for Policy Studies fellow and author of several books on Empire and conflicts in the Middle East. Criticizes Uri Avnery’s comparison of Israel to the zealots as unfair… to the zealots, who defended the oppressed against Rome. Relates a conversation with teenage girls about Dr. George Tiller’s murder, and takes a different slant on the abortion question.  Presents the Declaration of the Abya Yala – the indigenous populations of 22 countries. Reports on Friday’s massacre of indigenous Amazonians in Peru, with police firing live ammunition into a crowd of 5000 protestors.

Poem:

  • Pattiann Rogers, “The Greatest Grandeur”

Songs and/or Music Videos

  • Bonobo, “Days to Come”
  • David Rovic, “In the Name of God,” concert video
  • Big Country, “Soldier of the Lord”
  • XTC, “Dear God”

Audio Bonus

  • Interview with Phyllis Bennis