Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

3P-062 Education and Its Discontents

In this special 2-hour feature, Third Paradigm hosts the 10th anniversary episode of Unwelcome Guests. This show looks forward and backwards at whether schools at the university, secondary, and elementary levels are serving the greater good of society or the greater wealth of CEO’s. In celebration of 520 episodes, this show begins by reading Lyn Gerry’s introduction to the very first edition of Unwelcome Guests. It announces the many new features of the UnwelcomeGuests.net website, including show summaries, topic and speaker indexes, embedded audio player, interactive wiki design, and “collaboratory” studio: all provided through the altruistic largesse of Robin Upton. In the second hour, an alternative media forum called the UniverseCity is cited, with an invitation to listeners to join.

We start by looking at the current state of college financing through excerpts from “The Student Loan Scam” and “Wossamotta U.” Then Ben Manski from Unwelcome Guests #345 looks at college costs a generation ago, and how corporatization has accompanied the rise in tuition. This episode was called “Dumbed Down, Buttoned Down, or Locked Down – Throwaway People in a Disposable Culture.” The first hour ends with a reading from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig.

In the second hour, Ken MacDermottRoe of History Counts interviews John Taylor Gatto in his episode,  “Dumbing Us Down.” Then Kenneth Dowst of New World Notes plays the conclusion of one of John Taylor Gatto’s talks, followed by an excerpt from Jonathon Kozol, who observes the same phenomenon but reaches a different solution. Data is presented from Elizabeth Warren and Amelia Warren Tyagi’s book “The Two-Income Trap.”

Notable Quote: Keep in mind, this scheme was never intended…to be destructive, just the reverse. By converting Americans into specialized economic and social functions, into incompletely human human beings, this nation eventually achieved the most reliable domestic market in the world. The human mutilations of schooling are a trade0off for this prosperity. Comfort and security are achieved at the price of personal sovereignty and wholeness. That’s what makes extended childhood a paradox – give it up and people will enter a zone of great turbulence, since most people don’t have a clue what to do to make a living or how to entertain themselves. And the resolution of that turbulence nobody can predict.

Well-schooled people have a low threshold of boredom; they need constant novelty to feel alive. With only the flimsiest inner life, they must stay in touch with official voices…The cannot sit still without their minds wandering off to some commercial world or to the stock market…Well-schooled people must be poorly-trained in history, philosophy, economics, literature, poetry, music, art, theology, and anything known to develop a personal inner life… [It converts] spirits designed for independence into whiny, greedy, bored children who define themselves by what they consume…When you next find yourself appalled by infantile and irresponsible behavior that you see all around you, think of school as its forge and try to get rid of it.

– John Taylor Gatto

3P-061 Wossamotta U

Wossamotta U was the alma mater of Bullwinkle, an early teacher of the social innuendo. This episode examines the university as the self-perpetuating goal of education. We review the NY Times article “Placing the Blame as Students Are Mired in Debt,” the Washington Examiner article, “Higher Education’s Bubble is About to Burst,” and the eye-opening new book by Anya Kamenetz, DIY U. From her book, we cite statistics on drop-out rates, question the cost/benefit ratio, and take a jaundiced look at college from “The Economics of Education and the Education of an Economist.”

But from the last episode, we reconsider our conclusions from a Pew Center survey showing Republicans are happier than Democrats. And we ask, who funds the Pew Center anyway? We hypothesize that it’s the same group that’s grooming Presidential candidates, as John Perkins reveals they do for economic hit men. We end with a new educational paradigm, that compares apples to apples to measure the success of schooling.

Poems:

  • “When the Shoe Fits” by Chuang Tsu
  • “Straight Talk from Fox” by Mary Oliver

Songs and/or Music Videos

  • “A Day Without Rain” and “Tempus Vernum” by Enya
  • “Same Old, Same Old” by Chumbawumba
  • “Someday” by Brett Dennen

Excerpt

  • Question related to California’s Budget Crisis and Cabrillo College

To listen or view the multimedia transcript, click here!

3P-053 Biblical Blackwater and Interview with Max Blumenthal

Biblical Blackwater: Responds to an interview of Max Blumenthal, author of Republican Gomorrah, with an analysis of the Bible story of Sodom and Gomorrah. If taken literally, God disapproves of homosexuality, but approves of fathers offering teenage daughters to be gang- raped, and then impregnating them himself. If taken allegorically, God retaliates against rebellious nations by enslaving and oppressing them.

Examines the Amarna letters – diplomatic clay tablets sent to the Pharaohs from his Canaanite administrators complaining about the nomadic raiders and outlaws called the Habiru. Examines the evidence for whether Abraham was a mercenary warlord hired through the Pharaoh’s vassal-overlord, Kederlaomer, to put down the rebellion of Saddim (Sodom). This was an alliance of salt, named for the Valley of the Salt Sea: five cities who joined in an insurgency for independence. Was Abraham the notorious jackal Abdi-Ashirta, who took the Pharaoh’s territories from the kings of Gezer, Byblos, Jerusalem, Jordan, and the rest of the Canaanite cities? 

Poems:

  • Denise Levertov, “Beginners”
  • Margaret Atwood, “Up”

Songs and/or Music Videos:

  • Thievery Corporation, “The Forgotten People” 
  • DeVotchKa, “Transliterator”
  • The Bangles, “Walk Like An Egyptian”

Audio Bonus:

  • Interview with Max Blumenthal about the importance of calling out fundamentalists on what the Bible actually says, both literally and allegorically. Also touches on child-rearing, and proposes a third paradigm to disciplinarian vs. indulgent.

3P-051 CHIMPS: Cruzans Hosting Indie Media, Press and Schooling

CHIMPS: Proposes a partnership between Cabrillo College and the Santa Cruz community to start a new radio station focusing on independent news and analysis. Celebrates independent publishers like Anarchist Press and the well-disguised anarchist bookshop Capitola BookCafe. Sets the goal of enabling a self-educated generation, without debt, who know how to work with their hands.Discusses the movie, “The End of Poverty?” by Philippe Diaz and cites research by Susan George on the global South financing the North. Introduces David Rovic’s new feature, “This Month in History and Song.” Shows how Cabrillo’s Student Senate is out to break the spine of the textbook cartel. Relates Dennis Kucinich’s State sovereignty solution to healthcare and Jane Hamsher’s admonishment to play hardball. Speculates on a community college exchange for sustainability.

Poems:

  • Stan Rice, “Monkey Hill” 
  • Mary Oliver, “Wild Geese”
  • AmazingSuperPowers.com, “How to Be a Monkey” 

Songs and/or Music Videos

  • John Zorn, “End Titles”
  • Howie Day, “Collide”
  • David Bowie,”Space Oddity”

Informational Videos:

  • Democracy Now, “Philippe Diaz on The End of Poverty?”
  • Movie trailer, “The End of Poverty?”

3P-050 A is for Anarchist: the New Indie Student

A is for Anarchist: recaps the book The New Global Student: Skip the SAT, Save Thousands on Tuition, and Get a Truly International Education by Maya Frost. Reports research on study abroad, and her tips for getting around crazy expensive college costs while learning through your pores and having more fun. Tara the Transfer Diva explains how she rocks at Credit Quest, and we define terms like fego and halfpats. Of local interest, we propose a way for students to make themselves the most sought-after houseguests on the planet, with the help of Cabrillo College. A radio station is suggested in partnership with Cabrillo College and Santa Cruz indie news junkies, and a way to bridge the divide between trade school for dummies and academia for elitists.

Poems:

Songs and/or Music Videos:

Informational Videos:

3P-049 The Student Loan Mafia

The Student Loan Mafia: Based on a book by Alan Michael Collinge called The Student Loan Scam, explains how hard-working, responsible graduates become mired in impossible debt. Reviews the history of a predatory industry that has bribed universities, financial aid officers, and Congress to strip all consumer protections. Details the underhanded tactics, usurious fees, and draconian collection practices that have driven borrowers out of jobs, out of the country, and out of their minds. Gives some biography on Epictetus and the Stoics, and presents elements of the religion started by “Bokonon” in Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle. Elucidates the checkered past of Daylight Saving Time and questions whether it’s saving time or stealing it.  

Poems:

Songs and/or Music Videos:

3P-038 Don’t Make Me Hit You: The Rationalization of Violence

Don’t Make Me Hit You: Discusses the blaming of Zelaya, the Honduran President, for the violent acts of the coup regime. Looks at US and Canadian corporate interests in Honduras, such as Fruit of the Loom, Russell, Hanes, Gap, Gildan, Adidas, Nike, Dole, and Chaquita, and their response to Zelaya’s 60% raise of the minimum wage. Role-reverses Hilary Clinton and Mel Zelaya. Analyzes the question of whether morality is relative in terms of torture, terrorism, or killing, contrasting the zealots and the Q’uran to the Ten Commandments. Looks at military recruiting and the falsehoods and artificial choices presented to HS seniors.

Poem:

  • Demetrice Anntia Worley, “Feminicide/ Fimicidio” on the disappearances of women and girls in Cuidad, Juarez. Won the Split This Rock contest sponsored by Foreign Policy in Focus. 

Songs and/or Music Videos:

  • Sting and Peter Gabriel, Spanish version of “They Dance Alone” on the disappearances of men and boys by Pinochet. Performed in Argentina in 1998.
  • David Ippolito, “Torture is Wrong or We Can Do Better Than This,” great video
  • Sting, English version of “They Dance Alone”